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Proposed Policy


Local Resolutions


Monroe County Board of Commissioners

Monroe County agriculture is a large and viable industry.  According to the 2012 US Census of Agriculture (the most recent ag census), in 2012 there were 1,144 farms in Monroe County.  As reported in this census, these farms sold commodities during 2012 with a market value of $174 million dollars.

Monroe County Farm Bureau recognizes the financial investment the Monroe County Board of Commissioners make annually on behalf of the agricultural industry in Monroe County. We appreciate the proactive investment they make to keep our 4-H program highly successful.  We also recognize their support for the Conservation District and Spartan Ag Consulting.  According to Michael Bosanac, Monroe County Administrator and Chief Financial Officer, in 2017 investments on our behalf have been made for items such as:

1.  MSU Extension including staff, building, expenses etc., operating supplies and grounds maintenance

2.  Monroe County Conservation District.

3.  Spartan Ag Consulting

Total 2017 allocations for above programs = $261,791

4. Additionally, $29,784 is allocated to the Monroe County Economic Development Corporation to support all business in Monroe County, including agriculture.

We therefore resolve to express our appreciation to the Monroe County Board of Commissioners for this investment in support of the Monroe County agricultural industry and our families in Monroe County.

Motion By: 

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Road Commission Communications

Monroe County Farm Bureau needs to address the need for communication between the Road Commission and farmers.

Doing this would result in more "open" meetings with Farm Bureau farmers, Monroe County Road Commission, and/or their representative to participate in.

Be it resolved:

That Monroe County Farm Bureau take the initiative to address this need during the goal setting process; and therefore, encourage one meeting annually with the Monroe County Road Commission and/or their representative and farmers.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Road Commission

The Monroe County Board of Road Commissioners are making a noticeable and welcomed effort to pave and maintain Primary roads and bridges in the County.  Secondary roads with the assistance of many Townships have been improved as well.  The Board recently approved a $5 million road note in addition to funding from recent legislation at the state of Michigan to improve roads.  The money will allow 103 miles of chip seal projects and 65 miles of hot mix asphalt resurfacing projects in 2017.  The Road Commission has committed to be more proactive in making improvements on roads in the early stage.  The Commission has improved budgeting and created a capital improvement program for equipment and roads.

Therefore, be it resolved:  The Monroe County Farm Bureau commends the Board of Road Commissioners, Managing Director Randy Pierce, Director of Finance Phillip Masserant along with their employees and staff for moving the agency in a positive direction and making transportation more enjoyable for all that travel our roads in Monroe County.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Monroe County's Bicentennial 1817 - 2017

On July 14, Monroe celebrated its 200th birthday.  The celebration continues.  Monroe was named in honor of President James Monroe.  Several events commemorating the Bicentennial have been held throughout the county including events at the County Courthouse, Dundee Old Mill, Monroe County Museum, Monroe County Fair and many more.  It is good to step back and look how far we have come as a county and as an agricultural industry.  Many things have changed in the last 200 years and we look forward to the future in anticipation for what it holds.

Therefore, be it resolved: Monroe County Farm Bureau recognizes and thanks the ongoing efforts of the Monroe County Bicentennial Alliance to raise awareness and promote the celebration of Monroe County during its bicentennial year throughout 2017.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Agricultural Study Program at Monroe County Community College

Today's farming and agri-business jobs require a diverse set of skills, including scientific knowledge related to plant and animal production, precision farming methods and use of other technology, pest management, soil and conservation management, business management and finance, food safety practices, and equipment repair.  Specialized training is an important factor in helping meet the demand for these jobs.

In a resolution passed at last year's annual meeting, Monroe County Farm Bureau encouraged the development of an agricultural study program at Monroe County Community College (MCCC).  We are pleased that since last year MCCC has partnered with Michigan State University's Institute of Agricultural Technology to offer students an opportunity to earn a certificate in agricultural operations or an associate of applied science in agricultural operations.  Students wishing to work toward a bachelor's degree may receive preferred transfer status at Michigan State University after earning an associate degree at MCCC.

The agriculture program at MCCC will provide students with a solid background in plant and soil science, precision agriculture, agriculture management, entomology, plant pathology and additional fundamentals of agriculture.  Students will take courses from both MSU's Institute of Agricultural Technology and MCCC.

We commend the members of the ad hoc committee who, along with MSU administrators, worked to make an agriculture program at MCCC a reality.  Andy McCain is serving as Agriculture Program Coordinator at MCCC.

We resolve to support this program and to help make potential students aware of this educational opportunity.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Recycling

The Monroe County Environmental Health Department continues to provide County residents with a comprehensive recycling and pollution prevention program.  Programs are offered to assist in the proper disposal of hazardous wastes, pesticides, unwanted medicines, and recycling of electronics and newspapers.  We appreciate the efforts of Environmental Health Department to have successful annual tire collections for passenger and light truck tires.

We are especially grateful to the Environmental Health Department for their help developing a collection and recycling program for large truck, tractor, and combine tires.  We are also very grateful for Ida Co-Op for allowing us to use their Ida West Road facility for this year's collection event.

Richard Janssens, co-chair of the Promotion and Education Committee, Bob Potter MCFB Board Member, and Monroe County Environmental Health Department's Dan Rock and Chris Westover, along with many FB volunteers, all worked together on this program.  Funding for the program this year totaled $20,000.  The Environmental Health Department provided $13,800 from grant monies they received and Michigan Farm Bureau provided $6,200 for the program.  There was a 2-day collection event on August 23 and 24.  There were 112 participants, of which 73 were Farm Bureau members.  A total of 1,383 large truck, tractor, and combine tires were collected for recycling.  At $40 per tire, this saved farmers and other participants $55,000 in used tire disposal fees.

Even with the amount of large tires collected this year, a major problem still exists in Monroe County with the number of large truck, tractor, and combine tires that remain.  The Monroe County Environmental Health Department has already received a $10,000 grant for a 2018 large tire recycling event.

Therefore, be it resolved:  That Monroe County Farm Bureau Board continue the large truck, tractor, and combine tire collection and recycling program by making it one of their Goals for 2018.  The Board should appoint a committee to continue working with the Monroe County Environmental Health Department, securing additional grants needed to continue the collection and recycling program for large truck, tractor, and combine tires.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______


State Resolutions


Minimizing Potential Nutrient Movement from the Storage and Application of Dried Biosolids

Objective: To minimize potential nutrient movement from the storage and application of dried biosolids on land used for crop production.

• Biosolid land applications are overseen by the Michigan Department of Enviromental Quality (MDEQ).

• Biosolids of all consistencies contain nutrients needed in crop production.

• Dried biosolids are being applied to cropland as a nutrient source.

• Dried biosolids are being delivered, and sometimes stored, in close proximity to drainage ditches, including filter strips.

• The potential offsite movement of nutrients is not being considered in the permit process for the storage and application of dried biosolids.

• As producers, we need to follow good management practices to avoid having nutrients from manure or fertilizer enter drainage ditches and ultimately contribute to water quality problems in the western basin of Lake Erie.

Therefore, we recommend the following language be added to MFB Policy #76, Environmental Protection and Authority, as a new bullet under "We support":

• MDEQ, in consultation with the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), should review the rules for cropland application of dried biosolids to minimize the risk of offsite movement of nutrients from the storage and/or application of these products.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Land-applied Biosolids and Food Safety

Objective: To prevent potential human health hazards from the application of biosolids on land directly adjacent to fields growing crops for direct human consumption (fruits and vegetables).

• Biosolid land applications are overseen by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ).

• Biosolid application practices are intended to protect the environment and public safety. The rules dictate that biosolids should not be applied to land with a high potential for public exposure.

• It has been largely overlooked that applying biosolids to land directly adjacent to fresh food crops (your next meal) has the potential for public exposure.

• Biosolids contain pathogens and/or contaminants not normally found on farms. Pathogens and containments can cause illness if allowed to contact food crops grown for direct human consumption.

• Pathogens and contaminants can be moved away from application sites by wind, water runoff, insects, rodents and wildlife. Even though liquid biosolids are typically injected, there is still the potential for movement from application sites.

• Currently there are set back requirements for homes, schools, golf courses, businesses, wells, ditches and parks, but none for adjacent crops. Biosolids can be applied across a property line from fresh food crops ready for harvest.

• The understanding of food safety practices and hazard prevention practices has increased considerably since the 1990's when the rules for the land application of biosolids were developed (40 CFR part 503 and MI part 24).

Therefore, we recommend the following language be added to MFB Policy #12, Food Safety, as a new bullet after line 39:

• MDEQ, in consultation with the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), should review the rules for application of biosolids in close proximity to growing fruit and vegetable crops with the intent of preventing any potential human health hazards.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Noxious Weeds

With the increase in herbicide tolerance and resistance across many species of weeds, and especially hard to kill weeds such as giant ragweed, marestail, waterhemp, and Palmer Amaranth, it is more important now than ever to make sure that farmers and landowners control these noxious weeds.  Michigan currently has law on the books (Act 451 of 1994), however, this Michigan law is not up-to-date with the current noxious weeds found in our state.  Weeds such as those specifically mentioned above are very hard to control and produce high numbers of seeds when allowed to reach maturity.  Often times we see these weeds being out of control on vacant lots or tracts of land that have been purchased and are awaiting development.

Therefore, we recommend the following language be added to MFB Policy #31, Plants, Pests and Disease, line 59, under "We support":

• Swift action by our state legislature to update and revise Act 451 of 1994 to more accurately reflect the current noxious weed species.

• Periodic review of this law by our legislature to ensure that the current list of noxious weeds remains up-to-date.

• Encouraging local governments to take measures to keep these noxious weeks controlled.  We would recommend that local governments utilize their current blight officers to see that these weeds are controlled as best possible.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Broadband (District-Wide Resolution)

Replacement for current MFB policy #44, Broadband:

Broadband internet is defined as access that is faster than dial-up internet.  In sparsely populated, rocky, hilly or tree-covered terrain where fiber broadband connections are not feasible, a less expensive alternative is fixed wireless signals from towers.

Rural access to broadband internet service is a major factor that impacts the ability of rural Michigan residents to compete and participate in the economy.  It is an important issue for business, agriculture, and academic purposes for rural students.  It affects property values when families with children won't even consider living in a rural area without broadband access.  It's a quality of life issue with a tangible economic impact.  Recently, Governor Snyder's 21st Century Infrastructure Commission identified broadband access as one of the top infrastructure priorities.

We urge:

• The Legislatures support of the 21st Century Infrastructure Commission's recommendation of $50 million investment annually to improve broadband access.

• The state of Michigan develop a comprehensive policy for the provision of universal broadband access state-wide that is equitable in cost and quality in both rural and urban settings.

• The Legislature to allow townships to pay for broadband internet with special assessment districts where residents in the district pay for the broadband installation and services provided.

• Public-private partnerships between school districts, colleges, local units of government, businesses and residents to develop some cooperative, alternative funding measures to install fiber networks or towers.

• The continued cooperation between the Michigan Public Service Commission, broadband providers, and groups such as Connect Michigan to expand internet access in rural and underserved areas.

• Internet providers to continue taking advantage of financial subsidies to reach potential rural customers.

We oppose:

• Exclusive franchise rights in special assessment districts.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Farm and Commercial Vehicles (District-Wide Resolution)

We recommend the following language be added to MFB Policy #97, Farm and Commercial Vehicles, as an amendment to add line #16:

We support exemption of all farm vehicles of any size up to legal weight limit per axle from "no through trucks" ordinance and laws.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Environmental Protection and Authority (District-Wide Resolution)

The state of Michigan has a goal of MAEAP verification for 100% of farms in Michigan. MAEAP verification requires many special use buildings and structures.  These structures are then subject to being included in assessments of the farm for property tax purposes.

Therefore, we recommend the following resolution to be inserted between lines 38-39 to MFB Policy #76, Environmental Protection and Authority:

We encourage the exemption of these structures from being included in assessments on MAEAP verified farms.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Nonpoint Source Pollution and Watershed Management (District-Wide Resolution; Also a National Resolution)

Michigan's Lake Erie Domestic Action Plan is currently in draft form.  This Domestic Action Plan is being developed by the Michigan departments of Agriculture and Rural Development, Environmental Quality, and Natural Resources to reduce the amount of phosphorus entering Lake Erie.  Reducing phosphorus inputs to the lake is intended to help reduce persistent, intense algal blooms in the western part of Lake Erie, including those that are unsafe for people.

Michigan's draft Domestic Action Plan is one of several plans from surrounding states, the Canadian province of Ontario, and the U.S. and Canadian federal governments.  The final version, along with plans from other Lake Erie Basin states (Indiana, Ohio, New York and Pennsylvania), will be integrated into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's comprehensive plan scheduled for release in February 2018.

There are algal blooms occurring in Lake Erie.  The really bad algae blooms contaminate drinking water, harm fish and aquatic life, and prohibit recreation in the area.  Some believe it is as simple as two main causes of the algal blooms, which are (1) wastewater treatment deposits and septic tanks, and (2) nutrient run-off from agriculture.  Their theory is that if the states surrounding Lake Erie can tighten restrictions on wastewater and adopt certain agricultural practices, then Lake Erie can return to a healthy balance of algae, and the blooms will be prevented.

However, the experts are beginning to realize that the causes of algal blooms are actually a complicated mix of many factors and each will require time, money, and research to begin to solve.  We need to confirm what those factors are and to what degree they're impacting the problem, and then figure out the best way to fix them.  The problems and solutions need to be clearly understood before we farmers are told to spend time, money and resources on implementing new practices.

Therefore, we recommend the following language be added to MFB Policy #84, Nonpoint Source Pollution and Watershed Management, as a new bullet after line #36:

• The final version of Michigan's Lake Erie Domestic Action Plan should be designed to determine all the causes of algal blooms and come to a clear understanding of the responsible parties.  Michigan's Lake Erie Domestic Action Plan should determine the most effective solutions for all responsible parties, including agriculture, before farmers are directed to spend time, money and resources to implement new practices.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Herbicide Technology (Also a National Resolution)

Many farmers are running out of options to control herbicide resistant weeds.  New technologies such as Monsanto's Xtend technology and Dow Agroscience's Enlist technology are giving farmers additional tools to help control resistant and highly tolerant weeds.  Proper stewardship of this technology is critical to ensure its efficiency and availability to the marketplace.  Monsanto's Xtend technology is currently commercially available as well as the herbicide companion labels Xtendimax, Fexapan, and Engenia.  Since the commercial release of these companion herbicide products, there have been complaints of off target drift.  While not all of these complaints have been substantiated and since numerous reports also show that some of the complaints are due to use of non-labeled herbicide products, it is vitally important to use this technology as intended and labeled.  However, there are also findings that the herbicide label has been followed and drift is still occurring.

Therefore, be it resolved: Monroe County Farm Bureau supports the development of new herbicide technologies where feasible.  We encourage all farmers and applicators to be diligent about the application timing and to follow label directions very closely.  We also encourage state agencies to consider a possible Restricted Use Pesticide certification requirement in order to purchase and apply these herbicide products.  We further encourage state and federal agencies to press chemical manufacturers to fully investigate and find solutions to the off target drift where the herbicide was applied according to label requirements.  We also urge seed companies to follow up with growers and hold them responsible if they are found to be using herbicide products that are not labeled for in-crop application.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______


National Resolutions


Nonpoint Source Pollution and Watershed Management (District-Wide Resolution; Also a State Resolution)

Michigan's Lake Erie Domestic Action Plan is currently in draft form.  This Domestic Action Plan is being developed by the Michigan departments of Agriculture and Rural Development, Environmental Quality, and Natural Resources to reduce the amount of phosphorus entering Lake Erie.  Reducing phosphorus inputs to the lake is intended to help reduce persistent, intense algal blooms in the western part of Lake Erie, including those that are unsafe for people.

Michigan's draft Domestic Action Plan is one of several plans from surrounding states, the Canadian province of Ontario, and the U.S. and Canadian federal governments.  The final version, along with plans from other Lake Erie Basin states (Indiana, Ohio, New York and Pennsylvania), will be integrated into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's comprehensive plan scheduled for release in February 2018.

There are algal blooms occurring in Lake Erie.  The really bad algae blooms contaminate drinking water, harm fish and aquatic life, and prohibit recreation in the area.  Some believe it is as simple as two main causes of the algal blooms, which are (1) wastewater treatment deposits and septic tanks, and (2) nutrient run-off from agriculture.  Their theory is that if the states surrounding Lake Erie can tighten restrictions on wastewater and adopt certain agricultural practices, then Lake Erie can return to a healthy balance of algae, and the blooms will be prevented.

However, the experts are beginning to realize that the causes of algal blooms are actually a complicated mix of many factors and each will require time, money, and research to begin to solve.  We need to confirm what those factors are and to what degree they're impacting the problem, and then figure out the best way to fix them.  The problems and solutions need to be clearly understood before we farmers are told to spend time, money and resources on implementing new practices.

Therefore, we recommend the following language be added to MFB Policy #84, Nonpoint Source Pollution and Watershed Management, as a new bullet after line #36:

• The final version of Michigan's Lake Erie Domestic Action Plan should be designed to determine all the causes of algal blooms and come to a clear understanding of the responsible parties.  Michigan's Lake Erie Domestic Action Plan should determine the most effective solutions for all responsible parties, including agriculture, before farmers are directed to spend time, money and resources to implement new practices.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Herbicide Technology (Also a State Resolution)

Many farmers are running out of options to control herbicide resistant weeds.  New technologies such as Monsanto's Xtend technology and Dow Agroscience's Enlist technology are giving farmers additional tools to help control resistant and highly tolerant weeds.  Proper stewardship of this technology is critical to ensure its efficiency and availability to the marketplace.  Monsanto's Xtend technology is currently commercially available as well as the herbicide companion labels Xtendimax, Fexapan, and Engenia.  Since the commercial release of these companion herbicide products, there have been complaints of off target drift.  While not all of these complaints have been substantiated and since numerous reports also show that some of the complaints are due to use of non-labeled herbicide products, it is vitally important to use this technology as intended and labeled.  However, there are also findings that the herbicide label has been followed and drift is still occurring.

Therefore, be it resolved: Monroe County Farm Bureau supports the development of new herbicide technologies where feasible.  We encourage all farmers and applicators to be diligent about the application timing and to follow label directions very closely.  We also encourage state agencies to consider a possible Restricted Use Pesticide certification requirement in order to purchase and apply these herbicide products.  We further encourage state and federal agencies to press chemical manufacturers to fully investigate and find solutions to the off target drift where the herbicide was applied according to label requirements.  We also urge seed companies to follow up with growers and hold them responsible if they are found to be using herbicide products that are not labeled for in-crop application.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

International Trade Agreements

We commend President Trump in initiating the renegotiation of NAFTA.

Trade is critical to Michigan agriculture.  Nearly one-third of all our production is exported.

Therefore be it resolved, we urge:

• Harmonization be placed on sanitary and phytosanitary standards.

• Phasing out of Tariffs has been beneficial to Agriculture and the consumers in all three countries.  We would ask that any existing tariffs be phased out within this agreement.

• Greater access to the Canadian milk market be afforded to US. Dairy Farmers.

• The Canadian wheat board discontinue manipulation of Canadian wheat prices.

• Congress to continue to support Trade Promotion Authority for the President.

We support Gregg Doud, a former Senate Ag staffer, nomination as the Chief Agricultural Negotiator.  We support Ted McKinney, the current Indiana director of agriculture, nomination as the first Under Secretary of Agriculture for Trade and International Affairs.  We urge the Senate to put a priority on confirming them.

We encourage President Trump and the administration to re-engage in the trans-pacific partnership agreement. We would ask that the previous framework be used as a starting point in which to improve from.  Trading with decreased and/or eliminated tariffs benefits consumers in all of the countries participating.

AFBF Policy# 252, International trade

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

2018 Farm Bill

A new Farm Bill is scheduled to be acted upon in 2018.

Therefore be it resolved, we urge the following:

• The 2018 farm bill must include a high priority on crop insurance and development of broader range of products to help manage risk.

• More specialty crop and livestock Revenue Insurance products must be developed.

• USDA must refocus on a paperwork reduction format.  Repetitive information on multiple pages has created more paperwork for USDA staff and farm personnel, which also creates more opportunity for errors by USDA FSA and NRCS staff.

• The current price loss coverage (PLC) and agricultural risk coverage (ARC) programs are not effective for all Farms. The level of program support must be raised.

AFBF Policy# 239, National Farm Policy, §7.1

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)

Whereas water quality and nutrient management is the focus in many watersheds throughout the United States.

Whereas Conservation Reserve program (CRP) and Environmental Quality Improvement Programs (EQIP) filter strips are effective tools to managing nutrient runoff.

Whereas the growth of plants and the decaying organic material in filter ships also releases nutrients.

Therefore be it resolved:

• In watersheds of concern or impairment, that the plants grown in filter strips be removed at least once every other year.  The material which is removed may be spread on an adjacent field or may be completely removed for other uses.

• Amend AFBF Policy# 239, National Farm Policy, §7.2.4.5, by changing "The cap on CRP be raised to 32 million Acres."

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB) Funding

Washington has appropriated over 77 million dollars as of March 2016 to the WLEB, much of which has been spent on grants to Universities and independent groups for studying the algae bloom in Lake Erie.  The dollars appropriated to funding actual agricultural practices, which could have an impact on water quality, are being spent on government procedure, process, and staffing at various agencies.

Funds which are directed to practices to improve water quality are not getting to the land. Farmers are attempting to help mitigate nutrient runoff at great personal expense while those who are just talking about the issue are receiving the funds.

Therefore we be it resolved, we urge AFBF and MFB to continue working to streamline the bureaucratic process and to allocate more of the funding to improving water quality at the farm level.

Motion By:

Seconded By:

Member Action: Adopted______ Defeated______

Renewable Fuels

As the American consumer places more emphasis on renewable energy, ethanol and biodiesel have become viable alternatives to standard petroleum.  Greenhouse gases (GHGs) is 34% lower from corn ethanol than traditional gasoline.  In 2015, 10% of US vehicle fuel consumption was ethanol and over 96% of US gasoline contains ethanol.  The United States and Brazil produce 85% of the world's ethanol supply and in 2015, 38% of the US supply of corn became ethanol feedstock.  Michigan is the 12th largest ethanol producer in the nation with 5 plants currently in operation, producing 273 million gallons of clean burning ethanol last year.

Michigan is also home to one of two biodiesel facilities for W2Fuel.  Housed in Adrian, MI, the plant upgraded to an enzymatic reactor in 2015 that allows it to use recycled vegetable oils and other waste fats in addition to virgin corn and soy oil.  This increased production by 7 million gallons with a projected yearly production of 17 million gallons of clean-burning fuel called biodiesel.  This is EPA approved to be burned as 100% fuel in on-road and off-road diesel engines or as a blend with petroleum diesel. 

Per a recent UM environmental study, corn can produce 401 gallons/acre of ethanol and soybeans can produce 59 gallons/acre of biodiesel.  Other areas of development include cellulosic switchgrass (1,450 gallons/acre) and increasing interest in algae which can potentially produce 10-300 times more fuel per acre than other crops (5,020 gallons/acre).  Renewable sources of energy are the future of our country and we urge and support the following in order to develop and use these alternatives to oil:

• The retention of Renewable Fuels Standard

• The retention of the Biomass Crop Assistance Program

• Research into better performing engines of all sizes and types that run on renewable fuels, especially small and marine engines

• The public be given choices as to the blend percentage of fuel they wish to put into their vehicle's tank

• The elimination of federal & state subsidies and protection for the traditional petroleum and oil industry to encourage free markets and consumer demand to dictate the type of fuels produced

Motion By:

Seconded by:

Member Action:  Adopted: _______ Defeated______